OpBillC51: Anonymous Hacks Police Association of Ontario, Leaks Trove of Data

When Anonymous goes against you, there’s no way out! Same is going on with Canadian government who’s constantly under cyber attack against the approval of anti-terror law C-51 that weakens Internet privacy.

On June 24, 2015, Anonymous breached into the server of Police Association of Ontario, Canada (pao.ca) and leaked personal details of its 1,300 employees and registered users. 

In an exclusive conversation with the Anonymous hacker behind the breach, HackRead was told that the group will keep on targeting Canadian government against the approval of Bill C-51.

We are Anonymous. We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us
We are Anonymous. We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us

The leaked data contains site’s database, full names, usernames, emails along with their plain-text passwords.

The most important thing about this breach is that the leaked data has clear-text passwords which puts every account in danger. However, the admins were ”smart” enough to keep their passwords in hashes.

Canada approved controversial anti-terror law C-51 that actually provides Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) immense powers as it can violate digital privacy of any one at any time in the name of countering terrorism.

In retaliation, Anonymous shutdown the government owned websites including the online official portal canada.ca, Department of Finance and Treasury Board, the department responsible for the day-to-day administrative duties of the federal public service. 

On 23rd June, Anonymous hacked and defaced the official website of Montreal Police Union, leaving a video message against the bill C-51.

The bill grants spy agencies such as the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) immense powers as it can violate digital privacy of any one at any time in the name of countering terrorism. That means the CSIS will become the NSA of Canada.

The bill also lets government institutions exchange sensitive information such as tax filings and allows spies to infect the suspects’ devices with intrusive malware.

That’s all for now, folks.

Waqas

Waqas Amir is a Milan-based cybersecurity journalist with a passion for covering latest happenings in cyber security and tech world. In addition to being the founder of this website, Waqas is also into gaming, reading and investigative journalism.