A video demonstration by the University of California researchers how a simple text message can control your car.

The months of July and August have been bad for the automotive industry, thanks to the hackers who found out how easy it is to hack Jeep Cherokee leaving 470,000 vehicles vulnerable. As if that wasn’t enough when another hacker demonstrated how he can unlock and start General Motors (GM) vehicles with a hacked mobile app.

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Image Credit: YouTube

Now, the University of California at San Diego’s team of researchers has finally figured out the way to control some of the features of Corvette, that is, via texting.

According to the team, their theory was proven when they were able to hack into a 2013 Corvette’s OBD-II port, which was a cellular capable device, by sending a text message.

Such ports usually contain a dongle that generally insurance companies use for tracking the activity of the vehicle or the car’s driving efficiency. The findings of the report are later sent to the parent company.

On the Corvette, the team of researchers compromised the device manufactured by Mobile Devices. The group eventually was able to input both harmless and risky commands. For instance, cutting the brakes and activating the wipers. The vulnerability has already been patched by Mobile Devices.

Watch the video researchers hacking and stopping the vehicle:

The Fast Company stated that the phone numbers linked to these sort of devices are never made publicly available or accessible, therefore, to access them hackers use a system of capable “guessing”. This method lets them access the accurate information about the phone number.

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src src=”via” url=”http://www.wired.com/2015/08/hackers-cut-corvettes-brakes-via-common-car-gadget/”]Wired[/src]

Waqas

Waqas Amir is a Milan-based cybersecurity journalist with a passion for covering latest happenings in cyber security and tech world. In addition to being the founder of this website, Waqas is also into gaming, reading and investigative journalism.