Hackers Target Saudi Government Websites with “Good Intentions”

A group of hackers going with an online “Cyber of Emotion” hacked Saudi websites with “good intentions.

According to Al-Riyadh newspaper, more than 24 Saudi government websites have been hacked by a group despite the fact that the hackers warned the authorities that they would be attacking them.

The hack attack was carried out on Friday over a two-hour period by a group that calls itself “Cyber of Emotion.” The websites mostly served provincial areas.

saudi-government-websites-hacked
Hackers Target Saudi Government Websites with “Good Intentions”

On the day of the attack, visitors to those websites were taken to a page that read:

“We do not want to harm the site. Had it been hacked by enemies, your personal information, emails and registration data would have been compromised.”

In their tweet, the hackers stated that they had warned all the administrators of the websites already and informed them about the insufficient security measures on their sites. The group urged them to do something about it.

However, the hackers explained that their warnings fell on deaf ears and were largely ignored.

The hacked websites started working properly after a few hours.

The same group of hackers attacked the Twitter account of the Ministry of Justice in 2014 and posed a question to the ministry regarding the official statement about the costs of 186m Saudi Riyals ($45m) for creating a website.

Earlier this year, Saudi Arabia faced a much severe series of cyber-attacks including the one in which thousands of confidential documents were leaked publicly.

Those leaked documents contained details of correspondence between Saudi embassies around the world and the foreign ministry.

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Waqas

Waqas Amir is a Milan-based cybersecurity journalist with a passion for covering latest happenings in cyber security and tech world. In addition to being the founder of this website, Waqas is also into gaming, reading and investigative journalism.