U.K. Police don’t pay to unlock iPhones, they mug you while phone is unlocked

If this had happened in the United States, the FBI would have spent millions of dollars from taxpayers money and employed an overseas company to unlock the suspect’s iPhone but back in the United Kingdom things are calm and traditional.

Also Read: Turns out iPhone 5c can be hacked with a $100 hardware

To prove this, one can look at this recent incident reported by the BBC in which the Metropolitan Police were investigating a fake credit card crime ring in the country scamming people. The main suspect of this ring was Gabriel Yew who other than faking cards was also known for his involvement in other criminal activities and connections with gangs dealing with luxury goods in other parts of Europe.

Gabriel Yew file picture / Source: Metropolitan Police via BBC.
Gabriel Yew file picture / Source: Metropolitan Police via BBC.

The police department was stuck in the middle as Yew was using a separate phone for his criminal activities and authorities were certain if they got their hands on his iPhone it will reveal much more than fancy apps. At first, they thought arresting him may work but their next thought was what if he refuses to hand over his pin code to unlock the iPhone?

The detectives then decided to fake a street robbery and snatch his iPhone whenever he gets a call. This way, his phone would be unlocked and police can get incriminating evidence. When the operation began one of the detectives snatched iPhone from Yew’s hand while others made sure Yew didn’t fight back.

Upon successful snatching, detectives had no other option but to keep on swiping its screen to avoid getting it locked meanwhile the cyber crime unit was downloading its data. Jackpot for the department they found enough evidence to send Yew to prison. Police also traced his factory where fake cards were being printed.

Also Read: Backdoor on Your Smartphone Already Exists — Explained

What do you think about the latest tactic from the U.K. Police?

Ryan De Souza

Ryan is a London-based member of the HackRead’s Editorial team. A graduate of Maths and physics with a passion for geopolitics and human rights. Ryan places integrity at the pinnacle of successful journalism and believes this is somewhat lacking in traditional media. Ryan is an educator who balances his time between family, social activism and humanitarian causes and his vice is Football and cars.