Send Your Nude Pics to Facebook to Prevent Revenge Porn

Revenge porn is quite easy to spread on social media, and there seems to be no definite way to stop this trend. However, according to the team behind Facebook, there is one way to stop revenge porn, which is to make your nude pictures public yourself.

In this regard, the social network has already developed a testing system that uses image recognition technology to locate revenge porn and delete it automatically but to do it Facebook firstly needs the copies of your nude pictures. 😳

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The pilot scheme is currently activated in Australia where Facebook and the Office of the e-Safety Commissioner have collaborated to try this new idea. According to Australia’s e-Safety commissioner Julie Inman Grant, those who are worried about image oriented abuse on social media must provide their nude pictures to Facebook to safeguard their privacy later when those pictures are abused to launch revenge porn campaign.

It is also ensured that the pictures won’t be stored for long and just the link will be stored while the picture will be matched using AI and other photo matching technologies. This is helpful when someone tries to upload the same picture because its hash value or digital footprint will already be stored at Facebook archives and thus, it won’t get uploaded.

Grant stated that sending your sexy pictures to Facebook is similar to “sending yourself your image in email” but it would prove to be much safer, secure and “end-to-end way of sending the image without sending it through the ether.”

Facebook’s global safety head Antigone Davis told ABC News in Australia that the safety of Facebook users remains their top priority. The tools, she noted, have been developed by employing the expertise of global safety experts and prove that the social network is working hard to prevent harm from affecting the community.

“As part of our continued efforts to better detect and remove content that violates our community standards, we’re using image matching technology to prevent non-consensual intimate images from being shared on Facebook,” added Davis.

Reportedly, one out of five women in Australia between 18 and 45 years age and one out of four indigenous women in Australia become victims of abuse, and their private, intimate pictures are carelessly uploaded on social media as a form of revenge. Ms. Grant terms this sort of abuse as an utterly “devastating experience” for the victims. She even quoted a recent incident to prove her point:

“A very recent example is of course what happened with the Richmond Football Club and the image of the young girl with the sports memorabilia on her bare chest. She had asked the player to delete it; he said he did. Instead, it was sent to a few mates and ended up on the internet,” revealed Ms. Grant.

In the aftermath of this incident, the player Nathan Broad was suspended from playing the first three match of the AFL season 2018.

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Carolina

Carolina works for HackRead as a technical writer. She is a Brazilian traveller who has been to almost every country around the world. She has a keen interest in technology, gadgets and social media.