Luna Grabber Malware Hits Roblox Devs Through npm Packages

The campaign, which began at the start of August 2023, revolves around malicious packages impersonating the legitimate noblox.js, a popular Node.js Roblox API wrapper.

  • Roblox developers are being targeted by a new malware called Luna Grabber
  • The malware is being distributed through malicious npm packages that impersonate legitimate software.
    • Luna Grabber is capable of stealing sensitive data from victims’ web browsers, Discord applications, and local system configurations.
    • The malware was downloaded approximately 1000 times, but its impact was relatively low due to the security measures in place to protect developers on the npm repository.
    • The incident highlights the growing trend of malicious actors employing typo squatting to exploit developers’ trust in legitimate software packages.

    Cybersecurity firm ReversingLabs has uncovered a sophisticated cyber attack targeting developers on the Roblox gaming platform. Malicious actors have been distributing malicious packages through the npm public repository, attempting to exploit users by mimicking legitimate software while incorporating malicious payloads that steal sensitive information from victims’ systems.

    Malware Campaign Overview

    The campaign, which began at the start of August 2023, revolves around malicious packages impersonating the legitimate noblox.js, a popular Node.js Roblox API wrapper. By infiltrating the npm public repository, attackers capitalized on unsuspecting developers seeking to interact with the Roblox gaming platform using scripts.

    ReversingLabs researchers identified several malicious packages during the campaign, including noblox.js-vps, noblox.js-ssh, and noblox.js-secure. These packages were engineered to deliver multi-stage malicious payloads that targeted victims’ local web browsers and Discord applications. The most notable payload identified was Luna Grabber, an open-source malware designed to extract sensitive data.

    Malware Execution and Strategy

    Attackers meticulously designed the malicious packages to closely resemble the legitimate noblox.js package. By mirroring the original code and adopting similar naming conventions, the attackers aimed to deceive developers into downloading and using the compromised software.

    The malicious packages leveraged a variety of techniques to compromise victims’ systems, including the incorporation of a separate file named postinstall.js. This post-installation script triggered the execution of a malicious payload after the package installation was completed. The malware then determined whether the victim was operating a Windows machine and proceeded to download and execute the Luna Grabber malware from Discord’s Content Delivery Network (CDN).

    Luna Grabber: Information Stealing Malware

    The research revealed that the primary payload of the malicious packages was Luna Grabber, a highly customizable malware capable of stealing information from victims’ web browsers, Discord applications, and local system configurations. The malware was also equipped with features that enabled it to detect virtual environments and initiate a self-destruct mechanism if necessary.

    Interestingly, the attackers behind the campaign took advantage of the user-friendly nature of Luna Grabber’s builder application, simplifying the process of creating and configuring the malicious executable.

    Screenshot shared by ReversingLabs shows Luna Grabber builder

    While Luna Grabber’s open-source nature allowed attackers to tailor the malware to their needs, the choice of targeting developers on the Roblox platform suggests a focus on a specific user group.

    Limited Impact and Lessons Learned

    Despite the campaign’s sophistication, its impact remained relatively low. The malicious packages were downloaded approximately 1000 times, signalling that the security measures in place to protect developers on the npm repository were successful in limiting the reach of the attack.

    The incident sheds light on the growing trend of malicious actors employing typo squatting to exploit developers’ trust in legitimate software packages. This approach has been previously observed in other campaigns, such as the IconBurst and Brainleeches campaigns.

    Fake noblox.js-ssh’s npm website page (ReversingLabs)

    While multi-stage malicious packages are common on certain open-source platforms, such as PyPI, their presence on npm—where this campaign took place—represents the ongoing challenge of maintaining secure open-source repositories and the importance of cautiousness in choosing software packages for development purposes.

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