Biohackers Identified the Way to Transform your Eyes into Night Vision Goggles — It requires injecting your eye balls with a chemical that serves as night vision serum.

A small and independent group of researchers has identified a way to make humans see over 50m in the darkest areas during the night, thus, equipping them with night vision. The group is dubbed Science for the Masses and the research appeared in “people Becoming Superhuman” news.

Must Read: Color Blindness Curing Glasses Accidentally Invented by Scientist

This group of biohackers is based in Tehachapi, California. The team theorized that they can improve healthy eyesight to the extent that it can induce night vision. A chlorophyll type analog known as Chlorin e6 (or Ce6) is used in this procedure. It is found in several deep-sea fish and is typically used as an infrequent method for treating night blindness.

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Source: Science for the Masses

Jeffrey Tibbetts, the medical officer of the lab, states that “Going off that research, we thought this would be something to move ahead with. There are a fair amount of papers talking about having it injected in models like rats, and it’s been used intravenously since the ’60s as a treatment for different cancers. After doing the research, you have to take the next step.”

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Source: Science for the Masses

To perform this, the biochem researcher of the team Gabriel Licina has to convert into a guinea pig.

This can be termed as a very fine turkey blaster. Tibbetts gradually and cautiously dripped an extremely low dose of Ce6 (around 50microlitres) into the speculum-stretched eyes of Licina. His target was the conjunctival sac that transmitted the chemical to the retina.

Licina later stated that “To me, it was a quick, greenish-black blur across my vision, and then it dissolved into my eyes.”

Then the team waited for an hour and went out to a dark field to test the newly found superpowers of Licina.

It Worked!

Licina explained that initially he was able to view shaped that hung at a 10m distance. He says “”I’m talking like the size of my hand.”

Soon it became possible to recognize symbols and moving objects from longer distance and against various backdrops.

Licina further informed that in the other test “we had people go stand in the woods. At 50 meters, we could figure out where they were, even if they were standing up against a tree.”

The success rate was 100percent every time, says Licina.

These types of biohacks perfectly illustrate the wide scope of science and biology. A successful experiment like this means the ability to clearly see at night in the dark can be used for a variety of

purposes. For instance, it can prove to be ideal for search-and-rescue teams that can easily see in forested areas in a kidnapping or hostage situation during night time.

Moreover, it doesn’t require a colossal budget at all.

Tibbetts says, “For us, it comes down to pursuing things that are doable but won’t be pursued by major corporations. There are rules to be followed and don’t go crazy, but science isn’t a mystical language that only a few elite people can speak.”

So what’s in store for the future? This experiment although has met success but there are other tests that are to be done with hard science involving actual lab equipment and receiving real numbers on the eye’s electrical stimulation.

Licina explains, “Once you get the hard numbers, that’s it. You take it and quantify it and write it down, and release it. … This is how science works. It isn’t flashy. But it makes it more accessible. It shows it can be done. If we can do it in our garage, other people can, too,” according to MIC.

However, Wired report claim these Biohackers can’t give themselves Infrared Vision.


Waqas

Waqas Amir is a Milan-based cybersecurity journalist with a passion for covering latest happenings in cyber security and tech world. In addition to being the founder of this website, Waqas is also into gaming, reading and investigative journalism.